Spicy Pickled Eggs



You will need a one gallon glass jar with lid. I've done this in quart jars but, for several reasons, I really don't like doing it that way. The gallon jug seems best, or half gallon jug if you're cutting down the recipe. Frankly, I just don't see the point of pickling less than two dozen eggs. Hardly worth all the trouble considering how fast they disappear.

Ingredients:
4 dozen eggs, hardboiled and peeled. This recipe assumes that not all the eggs are going to make it (too ugly, too cracked, yolk exposed). I just made a batch of these and 43 of 48 eggs made it to the jar, it was the perfect amount. The five that didn't make it, cracked and pathetic looking as they are, will make an ugly but tasty bunch of devilled eggs for lunch tomorrow.

3 1/4 cups beer vinegar. I make my own (it's too easy). Plain white vinegar or white wine vinegar will do just fine.

*(see important note regarding this ingredient at bottom of entry) 3 1/4 cups of HEB's "Salsa Picante/Hot Sauce"--HEB (a Texas chain of grocery stores) is about 32 miles from my little town so when I go there, I stock up on this product. It's their Hill Country Fare (store brand) version of Cholula and they sell it by the liter for a mere .99. It's a steal! It's every bit as good as Cholula (overpriced spicy salsa with the round wooden ball for a lid) and is made with the same kind of peppers (Arbol). You can also use Tabasco instead. It's sold in half gallon and probably gallon jugs as well. I just prefer the Cholula style hot sauces.


Optional: Canned jalepnos or fresh or dried peppers. If you use canned jalepenos you can substitute part of the vinegar for an equal portion of the jalepeno "juice, " which is also known as "escabeche." It's tasty enough to do this, but one gets tired of jalepenos in everything around here. The pickled eggs in the photo above were made using a handfull of dried chile petines and pequines that I had from last season. In fact, Cholula is made from not just Arbol peppers, but also from chile petines.

Directions:

As the eggs are nearing being done or as you start peeling them, put a pot on the stove and add the vinegar, water, salsa, and any peppers you've decided to use. Bring to boil and then let simmer for approximately 20 minutes. Make sure your jar and its lid are especially clean. You don't want to introduce any funkiness into your pickling eggs.

Add peeled eggs to jar and cover with the hot liquid. No eggs should be exposed although you may not be able to prevent a floater or two from peeking out. Place lid tightly, not crazy tight, on jar and once it's not too hot to move, set the whole mess somewhere cool and dim for at least one month. You can eat the eggs before the four weeks is up, but they won't be good and ready until the end of a month. Unless your home is not air conditioned, the eggs will keep just fine at room temperature. Once it's time to eat them, you still don't need to refrigerate them unless you are just paranoid. They will NOT smell good, they will smell like sulfur and peppers. This is normal. But they will taste marvelous. If storing for more than two months or so, you should go ahead and refrigerate them.
During the first month of picklation, you might want to give them a little shake here and there to be sure all the eggs are getting their fair share of contact with the pickling mixture. Be warned, these are not meant to be stored for long periods of time. Pickled eggs will begin to get rubbery after a few months. It's best to eat them up. And, yes, they're wonderful with cold beer.

*NOTE: After a month of waiting I finally got to try these eggs and I've decided they're much better pickled in Tabasco. I just knew they'd be better in the Salsa Picante but they weren't. Teach me to write a recipe based on an assumption. I don't like Tabasco, as a rule, but it's definitely better for this recipe. Made with the Salsa Picante they're just okay, not TASTY! Something about the Tabasco makes them infinitely better. If you use Tabasco, use the same amount as you would if using the suggested amount of Salsa Picante and feel free to add canned jalapeƱos (juice and all) to enhance the flavor and for added kick.

8 comments:

Kim and Victoria said...

Like your new blog! Can you explain what "beer vinegar" is?
Thanks. Can't wait to try this recipe.

Photographer In Training said...

Hi Victoria!!! Beer vinegar is vinegar made from beer. I just posted my "how to make vinegar" entry. I keep hoping you'll decide to go for it and start making your own vinegar with your oh so wonderful wine leavings, they say you should use really good wine to make it. 1/4 cup here, a few tablespoons there, before you know it you've got a gallon or two of the most wonderful, gourmet vinegar. I hear pearl onions are divine pickled in red wine vinegar. Come on! Be my vinegar buddy!

Kim and Victoria said...

When we were in France my cousin's wife had some homemade vinegar going. It looked nasty as hell, but probably tasted fantastic.

Photographer In Training said...

It is kind of frightening to look at until it's been filtered. But it's as clean as could be and perfectly safe to drink unfiltered. Nothing like vinegar to keep things CLEAN. I can't wait to start a batch of champagne vinegar and rice vinegar. SOON!

Drew Kime said...

This is why I need to stop reading food blogs. Now I have to go buy a one-gallon jar.

Genie said...

Hi Drew! Thanks for stopping by! I found it easier to just go ask my mother in law for one. She gave me two. She's never throws stuff like that away.

If you make the spicy pickled eggs, I hope you enjoy them as much as we do! I have to share a dirty tip on that--give your eggs a little, um, BJ, and you'll have a lot less of them torn up--if any. Just crack them gently all over, peel off a small hole in the fat end (make sure to snag some of the membrane), put it to your mouth while cupping the egg in your hand and blow fairly hard. It loosens up the shell and membrane enough to make the egg so much easier to peel. And since you're pickling them--any germies from your mouth get exterminated in the vinegar. I wouldn't do this with eggs I intended to immediately serve to guests. Not if anyone was looking anyway.

Drew Kime said...

Finally a suggestion that makes sense. Everyone else claims that if you follow their specific formula for cooking them then they'll all peel perfectly. Your method gets to the real problem.

Oh, and there's lots of things that happen in the kitchen that you'd never do with people watching.

Genie said...

I've tried at least a dozen techniques for getting the eggs to peel better. The only thing I have ever really noticed is that super fresh eggs don't tend to peel as well as eggs that have been in the fridge for about a week. Other than that, nothing else has ever made a difference.

The blowing method is somewhat labor intensive--my jaws get sore. But, then, maybe that's because I was peeling three dozen eggs the day I learned about the technique!

Pico de Gallo

Pico de Gallo
Fresh, cool, delicious.

Anasazi Beans

Anasazi Beans
Dang, that's a pretty bean.

Mom's Beef Enchiladas

Mom's Beef Enchiladas
Except we used ground Axis.

My Solar Cooker

My Solar Cooker
Needs some refinements but it works!